All posts tagged: exercise

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HIIT for beginners

HIIT is a term which has recently been flying around the fitness industry like a kid in a sweet store (which is interesting as HIIT is supposed to shift the sweets – the effect of them that is). HIIT stands for ‘high intensity interval training’.  It means putting in all your effort, a harder amount of work, everything you’ve got for a short interval followed by a rest period or a low intensity interval.  This type of training burns fat and in a shorter amount of time – so no lack of time excuses here – and if that weren’t enough it also produces ‘afterburn’ in your muscles.  Once your workout is through your muscles will still keep burning calories.  So not only do you burn more fat, and in less time, you then continue to burn fat afterwards.  Essentially HIIT gives you the best bang for your buck. Give these HIIT sessions a go:                                         …

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I’ve got my Tight Pants on

In my room I’ve got my favourite pair of jeans hanging up, nope not in the cupboard, but hanging from a shelf. They don’t fit me anymore. Sure I haven’t tried them on in a while but the last I did I couldn’t pull them over my legs. I distinctly remember when I thought the washing machine was shrinking them, turns out it was just my legs growing, in the wrong direction. I’ve kept them as a reminder, and goal, of where I used to be and where I’d like to get back to. One fitness tip which people always suggest for weight loss is keeping old clothes. If you get rid of all your old clothes you won’t remember, or realise, how much weight you have put on. Makes sense right?! In a way it’s like a frog in boiling water, if a frog is placed in boiling water it jumps out. If I try and put these old jeans on I just won’t fit. If a frog is placed in cold water which …

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Today I punched my health choices in the face

Exercise and I have had a tumultuous relationship, one which started young and continues to this day. It’s like a bad relationship or phone contract you just can’t let go off. You know what I mean, we’ve all been there. This, for me, is exercise. “Exercise if you kick my butt one more time I’m out, it’s over. No more jumping HIIT sessions, or weights which I can’t even hold, no more moves which should only be done on a twister mat and if I hear one more thing about crossfit and its acronyms I’ll take its AMRAP and show it what I really think” Why is it that something which is so good for us causes us to go through pain? It’s so much effort and quite frankly I’d rather have Netflix judge me again for how I spend my time than have exercise make me throw up again, physically or metaphorically. Why is it then that exercise can create so many benefits and happiness for us, in the long run (no pun intended), …

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Compound vs Isolation Exercises

Weight lifting exercises are categorised into isolation and compound exercises.  Isolation exercises use a single joint for the action to take place and it puts stress on one major muscle, for example, bicep curl (elbow joint), leg extension (knee joint).  Compound exercises are multi-joint exercises, using multiple muscles and incorporating the whole body for stabilisation during the move, for example, squat (ankle, knee, hip joint), chest press (elbow, shoulder and scapulothoracic joint).  The most powerful athletes train with compound exercises, yet bodybuilders will use a lot of isolation muscles.  They both have their place so which do we use? Compound Compound exercises have a lot of correlation to everyday function.  Compound training, as a whole, is a great approach to training as it not only strengthens and stresses your muscles, but your ligaments, tendons and joints.  You need to have a strong frame to place muscles on, and I’m not talking bulking I just mean general toning, you want to be strong all over.  These types of exercises require significant amounts of body stabilisation.  Due …

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CFS…. So what is it?

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome noun – a medical condition of unknown cause, with fever, aching, and prolonged tiredness and depression, typically occurring after a viral infection -a viral disease of the immune system, usually characterised by debilitating fatigue and flu-like symptoms Hopefully you will have read my previous post on CFS and are now asking yourself ‘So what is CFS?’.  Well, after much controversy and research,  what CFS is can’t fully be known.  How you get it and how it is cured is also not fully known.  There has however been significant progress recently and CFS is now recognised as a disease (read about that in this NPR article).  Some people have argued that it stems from physical conditions, others physiological and still others psychological.  However,current opinion is now moving towards the likelihood of CFS resulting from an interplay of all of these and is very likely a made up of many of symptoms and conditions. It is estimated that around 25,000 people in the UK suffer with CFS and not all cases are the same …